Episode 51: Down by the River

cover51This episode includes the following segments: The Back Porch, The Front Porch, Ever-expanding Skill Set, Yarn Lover at Large and Gratitude Journal.


LISTEN:


The Back Porch

Scrappy Felted Oven Mitt pattern by Kelly Schroeder

Felted Vessels

Simple Yoga Socks pattern by Jennifer Wang

The Front Porch

Booga Bag pattern by Julie Anderson

Planorbis Corneus Shawl pattern by Hunter Hammerson

Clincher pattern by Ash Kearns


It’s not too late to enter the Asymmetri-CAL, an asymmetrical craft-along. Post your finished object to the prize thread by September 26th.


Ever-expanding Skill Set

Grilled Peaches & Cashew Crème

Grilled Peaches & Cashew Crème

Use #bulkbinscal when you post photos of your culinary adventures with nuts during the month of August. Barley will be in the spotlight for the month of September.

You can find all of the recipes I’ve developed during the Bulk Bins Cook-along here.

Yarn Lover at Large

New Jersey Sheep & Fiber Festival    September 6 & 7    Hunterdon County Fairgrounds

Gratitude Journal

“Many Miles” by Mary Oliver from Why I Wake Early

 

Grilled Peaches & Cashew Crème

grilledpeachesThis recipe is a variation of a summertime treat, and an easy way to please everyone at your cookout.

Grilled Peaches & Cashew Crème

  • 1-2 ripe peaches per person, peeled and pits removed
  • 1/2 c. raw cashew pieces
  • 1/2 c. water
  • juice of half a lemon
  • honey or maple syrup
  • freshly-grated nutmeg

To make the crème, pulse cashews in a food processor on high until the mixture is the consistency of flour. Add water and lemon juice and blend until smooth, white and creamy. The crème can be made ahead and refrigerated until serving.

Lightly brush peach halves with olive oil and place cut-side down on a skillet or grill. Allow peaches to sear (2-4 minutes). Turn if desired.

Arrange grilled peaches on a serving dish and spoon cashew crème on top. Drizzle honey or maple syrup over the plate. Garnish with freshly-grated nutmeg. Serve immediately.

Chili-lime Peanut Dressing

peanutI like this condiment for a cold summer salad. Prepare 2 cups of your favorite noodles and 3 cups vegetables. For the salad below, bring salted pasta water to a boil, then added edamame, carrots, and snap peas to blanch. Remove vegetables with a slotted spoon and add pasta to boiling water. Toss drained pasta with dressing while it’s still hot; stir in blanched vegetables, plus one cubed cucumber, once the pasta has cooled. Garnish with peanuts and cilantro leaves.

 

 

Chili-lime Peanut Dressing

  • 4 tablespoons organic, unsweetened peanut butter
  • grated rind and juice of one lime
  • 2 inch round of ginger, grated
  • 2 tbsp. soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp. thai red chili paste
  • 1 tbsp. brown sugar
  • 1 tsp. salt

Whisk ingredients together and season to taste. You can double the volume of the recipe and make a creamy version of this dressing by adding 2-4 tbsp. organic mayonnaise.

Episode 50: Podiversary

cover50This episode contains the following segments: Gratitude Journal, The Front Porch, Ever-expanding Skill Set and Double Happiness.

 

 


LISTEN:


Wildlife along the Delaware River

adult Black Bear near  Delaware River

adult Black Bear

Double-crested Cormorant

Double-crested Cormorant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Front Porch

Scrappy Felted Oven Mitt pattern by Kelly Schroeder

Scrappy Felted Oven Mitt
pattern by Kelly Schroeder

Ever-expanding Skill Set

Peach-almond Cobbler

  • cobbler2 lb. ripe peaches, peeled and sliced into wedges
  • 1 tbsp. sugar
  • 1/4 tsp. grated lemon rind
  • 1/2 tsp. lemon juice
  • 1/3 c. finely ground almonds
  • 1/3 c. whole wheat flour
  • 1/3 c. all purpose flour
  • 1/3 c. sugar
  • 1  tsp. baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. almond extract
  • 5 tbsp. cold butter, cubed
  • 1/3 c. hot milk

Preheat oven 400 degrees.

Toss first four ingredients together and spread in a shallow baking dish. Place in preheated oven for 10 minutes.

In a large bowl, stir together ground almonds, flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Use a pastry cutter to cut in butter until the mixture has a sandy texture. Add hot milk and use a fork to bring mixture together, quickly, into a dough. Do not overwork the dough, or it will be tough.

Drop dough by the spoonful over peaches. Sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar. Bake for 20-25 minutes. Cobbler dough will spread over peaches as it bakes.

Remove from oven and spoon into bowls immediately. Drizzle heavy cream over each serving.

Double Happiness

The Icehouse in Summer” by Howard Nemerov

Poetry Foundation

Poetry Off the Shelf, a podcast hosted by Curtis Fox

Episode 49: Putting Food By

cover49This episode includes the following segments: The Back Porch,  Yarn Lover at Large, and Ever-expanding Skill Set. I announce the Bulk Bins Cook-along prize winner for July and list the prizes for the Asymmetri-CAL.


LISTEN:


calAsymmetri-CAL Updates

There is an assortment of very cool prizes for our Asymmetrical Craft-along. Thanks to everyone who has generously contributed a prize. You can see photographs of the prizes on the finished object thread on Ravelry. Join in the fun. It’s not too late to start now; the CAL continues until September 26. To participate, you knit, crochet, weave or sew a garment or accessory that is asymmetrical in design, structure, or use of color. There are progress photos and camaraderie on the chatter thread.

The Back Porch

In order to win Stash Dash this summer, I needed to turn production into high gear for the end of July and the first week of August. The friendly competition, hosted by TheKnitGirllls, invites crafters to knit, crochet, spin, and weave the equivalent of 5K of yarn. My self-imposed goal was not only to use 5,468 yards of yarn from my stash, but also to engage in as many different crafts as possible. Since the last episode, I was quite focused and completed three projects: two woven scarves, and a shawl design by Simone Eich of WOLLWERK. My total yardage for Stash Dash this year was 6,037 yards.

trophystrtiffany

 14 total projects — 6,037 yds

Yarn Lover at Large

Last week, Samuel and I visited the Warren County Fair. It’s a small fair, but there was plenty to see and do, including petting the sheep and alpacas, watching the baby goats jump around their pens, paying our respects to the poultry, pigs, cows and horses, and wandering through the produce tent. One of the 4H groups had spindles for sale: $10 included the spindle, fiber and a free spinning lesson. Too bad we were visiting during the animals’ dinner time, so the girls were pretty busy with their livestock. There was great fun at the tractor pull, which featured vintage machines as well as tractors with stock-car engines. I don’t know enough about this event to write about it convincingly; all I can say is that there was smoke and noise and dust enough to please any fair-goer.

The Hunterdon County Fairgrounds, where I attended the fair each year in late August, is now a vast landscape of strip malls and parking lots. The new fairgrounds are located a few miles away in Ringoes, New Jersey. This September (the weekend after Labor Day) I’ll be volunteering at the New Jersey Sheep & Fiber Festival on Saturday morning, to help out at the Fleece Show and Sale Tent. This is a small festival, but with some excellent vendors. If you’re interested in volunteering, you can find a list of options and contacts here.

Ever-expanding Skill Set

tartNuts are in the spotlight during the month of August. Expand your skill set by participating in the Bulk Bins Cook-along. Shop the bulk bins at your local supermarket or health food store. Buy some nuts. Look up recipes online or create your own. Replace other proteins in a dish with nuts. Take photographs of your culinary creations and post them to social media with #bulkbinscal. This week, I hunted down a recipe I haven’t made in awhile. It’s the Lemon-almond Pan Tart from Mark Bittman’s The Minimalist column. I really miss that column and the accompanying videos. This tart works for breakfast or brunch. It even makes an elegant dessert. The next time I make it, I will replace the lemon with lime and the cream with coconut milk for a festive sumer variation.

puttingIt’s taken several tries, but I’ve finally convinced my mother to share some of her expertise on the podcast. We spent the day canning in her kitchen, and sat down for a few minutes to talk about food preservation. Hopefully, I’ll be able to bring additional segments from Mom in future episodes; she is a master of many practical arts. One of my favorite things to do in Mom’s kitchen is to look through her collection of recipe books. Pictured is her copy of Putting Food By, the canning reference to which she frequently consults. This well-loved edition has no front or back cover; even the spine is in tatters. This week’s episode cover is a photo taken in Mom’s pantry, where the beautiful jars of preserved produce are arranged on wooden shelves.