Episode 275

This episode centers on discussion of Elizabeth Zimmermann’s newsletters — how they evolved over time from a sales list to the biennial publication Wool Gathering; how they became a means for EZ to share knitting designs and variations in template form; and most importantly,  how the newsletters helped to make a growing knitting community visible to itself.  Dr. Lilly Marsh, engaging and entertaining as ever, shares evidence and details from her research.


Dr. Lilly has shared a slideshow of images featuring EZ’s published patterns. You can find a video of the slideshow on YouTube.

Comments are welcome!  You are invited to post your comment to this blog post.  You may also contact Dr. Lilly via her website, Lilly Marsh Studios.  Finally, there is a thread with lively chatter on the Yarns at Yin Hoo group on Ravelry.


The “Dear Knitter” salutation, as well as the long, narrow size produced on off-cuts of paper from a local printer, are evident in this photograph of Newsletter #2, Winter 1959.

Newsletter #12, which includes a steeked Aran V-neck pattern. Illustrations of the cables were hand-drawn by Elizabeth.

 

Episode 273

This episode is focused primarily on Zimmermann’s early work with industry and how she managed a parallel track between developing her own mail order yarn and design publication business with her increasingly critical work within industry spaces and practices.  Dr. Lilly Marsh shares some gems from her research, including excerpts from local newspaper articles, and snippets from “the lost document” that reveal her deepest desires for fostering a knitting community.


Dr. Lilly has shared a slideshow of images featuring EZ’s published patterns. You can find a video of the slideshow on YouTube.

Comments are welcome!  You are invited to post your comment to this blog post.  You may also contact Dr. Lilly via her website, Lilly Marsh Studios.  Finally, there is a thread with lively chatter on the Yarns at Yin Hoo group on Ravelry.


Image of a passage copied (1977) in EZ’s handwriting, from Hundreds and Thousands (1966) by Canadian artist Emily Carr. Near the close of this episode, Dr. Lilly provides a wider context for this passage, based on her wider reading of the text.

Episode 272

In this episode, I catch you up on my recent projects.  There’s lots of sewing, including this darling clothespin bag, a dress with voluminous sleeves, and more mending for Mom.  I’ve begun knitting a cowl in spring colors with yarn from Robin of Birch Hollow Fibers, and I have some poems that are perfect for spring, plus a new-to-me recipe that I encourage you to try!


I was so lucky that Mary Jeanne Packer introduced me to Robin at Vogue Knitting NYC.  Robin’s Sojourner Sock is spun at Battenkill Fiber Mill–speaking of which–did you know the Washington County Fiber Tour is ON?  Check it out!

Join in the fun as we knit the Baby Surprise Jacket designed by Elizabeth Zimmermann.  This KAL will continue through all eight parts of my conversation with Dr. Lilly Marsh.  All details for the KAL and the 8-part series can be found on this Ravelry thread.

My sock knitting is on pause at the moment while I work on this cowl for spring.  I’m alternating beautiful colors dyed by Robin of Birch Hollow Fibers.  There’s also a bit of yarn from Liesl of Buckaloo View in there too.

More sewing and stitching in the works.  I have another pair of Mom’s well-worn jeans to mend, and I’ve cut the fabric for View A of McCall’s M7969.



Episode 271

ELIZABETH ZIMMERMANN AND THE EMERGENCE OF CRITICAL KNITTING

PART 3

In the third part of  an eight-part series with Dr. Lilly Marsh, we learn how Elizabeth Zimmermann’s desire for quality materials evolved into a business opportunity. We also hear about her participation in the Wisconsin State Fair and her ongoing (and ever-shifting) membership in the Wisconsin Designer Craftsman organization.

There is an ongoing discussion on this Ravelry thread, where Dr. Lilly chimes in.  We have begun a Baby Surprise Jacket knit along and will continue knitting and chatting about this very clever design until the series concludes.

Many of you have expressed your gratitude for this in-depth exploration of Elizabeth Zimmermann’s life and your wish to make a contribution to our efforts.  A donation to the Hudson Valley Textile Project is an excellent way to honor our work and to promote sustainable textile production in the region where we live and work. At the top of this episode, Dr. Lilly shares some exciting news about the passage of NYS Legislature Bill s3396, which establishes  that the New York state animal and plant fiber program will now be part of the New York state Grown and Certified Program! Your contribution to HVTP will be a means of promoting the efforts of fiber producers in the Hudson Valley.

Studio Craft, Professionalism, and Instituted Identity

images provided by Dr. Lilly Marsh

An advertisement in the October 1956 New Hope Gazette.

Program and entry cards from the Wisconsin State Fair.

1961 recognition of award and invitation to the opening reception.

The image Dr. Lilly muses about at the conclusion of this episode, in which Elizabeth poses with entries to the 1960 Wisconsin Designer-Craftsman Show.  The page is scanned from The Opinionated Knitter.

Episode 270

EZ and BSJ

This episode is chock full of finished and new projects, plus I’ve added a new post-apocalyptic life skill and some quilting to my list!

THE BACK PORCH

Glynn by Whitney Hayward in Harrisville nightshades (vinyl)

Curlew Hat by Linda Shearer in scraps of J&S and MW British Breeds

shortie socks in KnitSpinFarm corriedale sock (cherry blossom festival)

THE FRONT PORCH

The beautiful colors of Berroco Vintage I’ve chosen to knit a Baby Surprise Jacket.  Join in the fun and check out progress of fellow YAYH listeners on our Ravelry thread, where there is lively chat about my conversation with Dr. Lilly Marsh.

EVER-EXPANDING SKILL SET

I first encountered this Nordic method of woolen washing on the Yarniacs’ podcast.  After finding a bit of advice from WJ Johnson, also known as Sagahill, I decided to give it a try with some knitted pieces that have been getting a lot of wear this winter.  First, I spritzed everything thoroughly with SOAK.  Then, I left in the snow for one hour, shook out, flipped, left in snow for another hour, shook out.  The pieces were NOT wet, just damp and they dried quickly once inside.  The result is freshened garments — not exactly cleaned ones.  Given the time and effort, though, I would say this is a success and I will use the method again to make the most of a snowfall!

OFF THE SHELF

AND SEW FORTH

TATTER’s Whole Cloth Quilt class with Aaron Sanders Head was an opportunity for me to learn some techniques and try my hand at quilting, as I use some fabric from a failed eco-printing project!  Check out the class offerings at Tatter and consider giving one a try.

In this episode, I share my tips for sashiko mending of jeans.  This is a pair of VERY worn stretch jeans that my mother had just about given up on.  Now I hope she will enjoy getting some additional wear out of them.

 

 

 

a podcast about the fiber arts and other post apocalyptic skills